Monthly Archives: October 2013

The Guyana/Venezuela Boundary

The Guyana/Venezuela Boundary

by Peter Halder

      In 1830 Venezuela became independent from Spain. A year later, in 1831, Great Britain united the three colonies of Essequibo, Berbice and Demerara into a single colony – British Guiana. The Dutch founded the colonies of Essequibo and Berbice in the early 17th century and added Demerara later. The colonies changed hands among the Dutch, French and English during European wars. In 1814 they were ceded to Britain.

The independence of Venezuela and the creation of British Guiana led to the need for both countries to define the border between them.

Britain took the initiative to determine and define its western boundary with Venezuela. In 1840, Britain engaged the services of the famous international explorer Robert Schomburgk to traverse the entire county of Essequibo, beginning from the left bank of the Essequibo River, to determine where the boundary should be drawn.   Continue reading

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Guyana: Three Riverain Meals

THREE RIVERAIN MEALS

 by Peter Halder

ALL-IN-ONE

Also known as Bush Food, All-in-One is a kind of Cook-Up Rice or One-Pot. It is a variety of items cooked in one large iron pot.

The ingredients included rice with green plantains, hog tannia, oku yams, cassava and ochro cut up into small pieces, dried pigeon-peas, cut up eddo leaves, broad leaf thyme, onions, tomatoes to add colour, and red and yellow wirri- wirri pepper. Meat included both fresh and smoked labba, wild cow, wild hog, smoked hymara (fish) and cut up salted pigtails and pig snout. It was cooked with lots of coconut milk and broth from boiling the bones and gristle of wild animals.             Continue reading

BRITISH GUIANA – Governors In The 1900s

BRITISH GUIANA – Governors In The 1900s

 by Peter Halder

      There were 17 Governors of British Guiana from 1900 to 26 May 1966 when the colony became the independent State of Guyana.

     According to reports, the most popular Governor was Sir Gordon James Lethem, 1941-1947.

     Sir Walter Egerton, 1912 – 1917 and Sir Wilfred Collett were the Governors of Britain’s only colony in South America during World War 1 (1914-1918). Sir Wilfred Edward Jackson, 1937-1941, and Sir James Gordon Lethem, 1941-1947, were the Governors during World War II, 1939-1945.

     Sir Alfred William Savage was Governor, 1953-1955, when the British Government in October 1953, suspended the Constitution of the colony, declared a State of Emergency, deployed British troops and removed the elected Government of the People’s Progressive Party which won a landslide 18 of 24 seats in the Legislative Assembly in the General Elections in April, 1953. Governor Savage, who according to reports played a significant role in what transpired, assumed direct rule.       Continue reading