Monthly Archives: September 2014

THE PIAI’S DAUGHTER- from an Ancient Amerindian Myth

THE PIAI’S DAUGHTER

(Adapted from an Ancient Amerindian Myth)

by Peter Halder

 

Aleda

    Aleda was an Amerindian maiden. She was the daughter of Aban, a Piai or Medicine Man. The two lived in a troolie palm thatched home in the dense tropical rainforest.

The beautiful girl kept house and did all the cooking and cleaning. Her father was proud of her. He once told her, “My wonderful daughter Aleda, one day you will make a handsome young man a wonderful wife, He will be proud of you and I pray you two will be very happy.”

One day, Aleda was walking to a nearby creek to fetch water when she heard dogs barking. Holding a large earthen water goblet very tightly, she quickly ran behind a wide oak tree and hid from the trail.   Continue reading

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THE THREE PRINCES, E-book #8, – by Peter Halder

THE THREE PRINCES, E-book #8, by Peter Halder

the three princesTHE THREE PRINCES, E-book #8, by Peter Halder combines a pair of exciting, breath-taking, action filled fairy tale adventures. The Princes are three brothers who sail the seas in search of adventure which they find. In a far off land, the King’s three daughters are kidnaped by three giants, one with 8 heads, one with 9 and one with 10. In bizarre circumstances, the youngest Prince, assisted by a Fairy, battles all three to rescue the Princesses.

In the second tale, The Prince and The Ice Girl, a beautiful damsel is seized by an Ice Giant and held captive in an ice bubble. A young Prince travels to the Land of Ice, meeting strange adventures on the way, and battles the Ice Giant to rescue the girl. Both tales are filled with strange events, thrills, magic and happy endings. Continue reading

The Waif of Ruimveldt – A Folk Tale – By Peter Halder

THE WAIF OF RUIMVELDT … A FOLK TALE

By  Peter Halder                      

The Waif

            He appeared from nowhere and disappeared to nowhere.
He appeared to be a child, no taller than four feet and thin.

He appeared suddenly one morning on the wide path along the cane fields on the southern side of the trench separating the Laing Avenue apartments, from the sugar cane fields at Ruimveldt.         The Waif of Ruimveldt, as he came to be known, was dark skinned, had black curly hair and a round face with a perky nose and thin lips. He wore a green short-sleeve shirt and short green pants. They matched the color of the cane fields. He was bare feet.

            The Waif placed on the grassy ground several Monkey Apples which grew on a tree in the woods beyond the cane fields. He picked them up one by one, mashed each in his right hand and dropped the orange colored pulp and seeds on the ground forming a wide circle. Continue reading