Tag Archives: British Guiana

The Guyana/Venezuela Boundary

The Guyana/Venezuela Boundary

by Peter Halder

      In 1830 Venezuela became independent from Spain. A year later, in 1831, Great Britain united the three colonies of Essequibo, Berbice and Demerara into a single colony – British Guiana. The Dutch founded the colonies of Essequibo and Berbice in the early 17th century and added Demerara later. The colonies changed hands among the Dutch, French and English during European wars. In 1814 they were ceded to Britain.

The independence of Venezuela and the creation of British Guiana led to the need for both countries to define the border between them.

Britain took the initiative to determine and define its western boundary with Venezuela. In 1840, Britain engaged the services of the famous international explorer Robert Schomburgk to traverse the entire county of Essequibo, beginning from the left bank of the Essequibo River, to determine where the boundary should be drawn.   Continue reading

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Book Review: The Cat of Muritaro

Book Review: The Cat of Muritaro

August 25, 2013 | By  | Filed Under News

 Tales of Horror reap high marks
Critic: Dr Glenville Ashby
The Cat of Muritaro is a compilation of eight fantastical tales culled from the belly of Caribbean folklore. Peter Halder, a former journalist pens a fast-paced, gnashing and melodramatic oeuvre that will terrorise the young and innocent while tantalising the curiosity of occult aficionados.cat
Although the setting is Christianburg, Alberttown and Stabroek in British Guiana, the phantasmagoria belongs to every Caribbean folk who was spoon-fed with characters of the spirit world. Admittedly, this book is not for everyone. Some shy away from this genre for obvious reasons. But experience has taught me that the supernatural is part of the Caribbean archetype.
Hadler speaks to the reader in the vein of the griot, making ‘Muritaro’ a part of our oral tradition. His prose is lucid and unencumbered with the extraneous detail and flattery of creative writing. In the same breath it can be faulted for being a tad short on suspense, and light on the flavourful Guyanese argot that generates richness and authenticity.   Continue reading

The Jordanites – By Peter Halder

Guyana Stories by Peter Halder

The Jordanites

by Peter Halder

 Colonial Era

Religion played a fundamental role in the British administration of its colony of British Guiana.

It was most probably the policy of the British that in a multiracial country with many races- African, East Indian, Chinese, Portuguese, the indigenous Amerindian, European and their inter-mixtures- and with different cultures and religious practices, the foundation, growth and spread of the Christian religion, could and would convert, indoctrinate, assimilate and unite the many races into a united nation. The colonialists went further. They recognized that the older generation was probably beyond conversion, indoctrination and assimilation, so their policy was to focus on the children, the new generation.

Churches dotted the landscape of Georgetown and environs, as well as the countryside.    Continue reading

Alexander Alexander – by Peter Halder

Alexander Alexander

by Peter Halder

    Today, many poor, destitute and homeless persons in Georgetown sleep at nights on cardboards on the concrete pavements adjacent to stores.

    It is not the first time that it has happened. It occurred many years ago. And one man, a Scotsman, dedicated his life, at that time to making life easier for them. His name was most peculiar. It was Alexander Alexander.

    Alexander Alexander was born in Scotland. Fed up with life there, he decided to seek his fortune and future in one of the many British colonies. He chose British Guiana.   Continue reading